Monthly Archives: April 2011

Jenticha — 1942 AD, Nepal

In Northern India and southern Nepal, there is a language called Sunuwar, alternatively Kõits-Lo, Mukhiya, Kiranti-Kõits, Koinch, Koincha, and Koints.  In 1942, Karna Jeticha developed a script for this language. There have been two versions of Jenticha: the first was … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, Alphabet, inventor known, National pride, Rating: 4 "Huh, interesting!" | 1 Comment

Meitei Mayek — 1100 AD, India

The Meitei Mayek script — also sometimes called Meithei Mayek, Meitei Mayek, or Manipuri — looks very different from the the Bengali/Assamese script that is now used in Manipur and its Indian/Bangladeshi neighbours.  It also looks very different from the … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, Rating: 4 "Huh, interesting!" | 2 Comments

Assamese — 1200 AD, India

Assamese is interesting because it is so very close to Bengali script.  There are only two characters which are different. Frequently, writing systems differ by a few characters because a writing system was adapted for spoken language B from a … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, National pride, Rating: 4 "Huh, interesting!" | Leave a comment

Syloti Nagari — 1550? AD, Bangladesh

Syloti Nagari, also called Sylheti Nagari, was used in northeastern India from around 1550 AD until the 1970s.  The region where it was used — the Sylhet region of Bangladesh — has been Muslim for a very long time, which … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, Rating: 5 "Whoa!!" | 2 Comments

Mithilakshar — 1300 AD, India

Mithilakshar — also called Maithili, Mithilaksara, and Tirahut — has been used since the 14th century in the northeast part of India, although it has limited use now.  It is very similar to Bengali, so much so that early 20th … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, now ceremonial, Rating: 4 "Huh, interesting!" | Leave a comment

Kaithi — 1500 AD, India

Kaithi is Brahmi-derived, descended from Nagari. Because of the fuzziness in when Bengali split from Nagari, it’s not really clear whether to say if Kaithi is descended from Bengali or from Nagari; this means Kaithi is either sibling to Devanagari … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, Rating: 3 "I did not know that" | Leave a comment

Oriya — 1100 AD, India

Oriya probably descended from Bengali, though some say Kalinga (a script so obscure I can’t find out much about it, and which unfortunately shares a name with a language spoken in the Phillipines). Oriya looks quite different from the other … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, Rating: 5 "Whoa!!", technology influenced | 4 Comments

Bengali — 1100 AD, Bangladesh

Bengali script, sometimes called Bangla, evolved gradually from Nagari, which makes giving it a starting point difficult.  Certainly Bengali was a separate script by 1778, when the first metal type was cut for it, but the date sources say it … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, Rating: 4 "Huh, interesting!" | 5 Comments

Modi — 1600 AD, India

Like Gujarati, Modi is a variant of Devanagari that was developed in about 1600 AD. Like Gujarati, it was used mostly for accounting, then later for administration. It looks very similar to Devanagari, but with fewer ligatures, rounder/”swoopier” glyphs that … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, Rating: 2 "Not all that interesting" | Leave a comment

Gujarati — <1600 AD, India

Gujarati is a direct descendant of Devanagari, used mostly but not exclusively for writing the Gujarati language. Like the Landa scripts, Gujarati was initially used mostly for commerce. It is sometimes called “banker’s script”, “merchant’s script”, or “trader’s script” in … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, Rating: 3 "I did not know that" | 2 Comments