Category Archives: now ceremonial

Old Hungarian — 600? AD, Hungary

Hungary, despite being solidly in Europe, has had a long history of trade with and conquest by Central Asian peoples.  It is not entirely clear where Hungarians came from — or more specifically, where the people who brought the Hungarian … Continue reading

Posted in Alphabet, now ceremonial, probably first in its area, Rating: 3 "I did not know that" | 2 Comments

Tolong Siki — 1999 AD, India

Tolong Siki was developed rather recently for the Kurukh spoken language.  Previously, Devanagari was used (and is still used in large part a decade later). Tolong Siki is one of the few languages that was created from scratch collaboratively that … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, National pride, now ceremonial, Rating: 3 "I did not know that" | Leave a comment

Sora Sompeng — 1936 AD, India

In the history of writing systems, it is not uncommon for people create writing systems based on dreams or visions.  It is also not uncommon for writing systems to have particular religious significance.  It *is* somewhat rare for people to … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, inventor known, now ceremonial, Rating: 4 "Huh, interesting!", revealed in a dream | Leave a comment

Grantha — 500 AD, India

Around 500 AD, the Tamil people of Southern Inda started using Grantha, a slightly different form of the Brahmi alphabet, to write Sanskrit (the language of sacred Hindu texts), while still continuing to use Vatteluttu to write representations of the … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, Evolved slowly from parent, now ceremonial, previous script didn't quite work, Rating: 4 "Huh, interesting!" | 4 Comments

Pau Cin Hau Logograms — 1902 AD, Mayanmar

In 1902 AD, a man named Pau Cin Hau had a dream where the characters of a logographic script were revealed to him.  He also developed the Laipian religion, and his script was used extensively in liturgical works.  Laipian actually … Continue reading

Posted in inventor known, Logograms, National pride, now ceremonial, Rating: 3 "I did not know that" | 6 Comments

Mithilakshar — 1300 AD, India

Mithilakshar — also called Maithili, Mithilaksara, and Tirahut — has been used since the 14th century in the northeast part of India, although it has limited use now.  It is very similar to Bengali, so much so that early 20th … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, now ceremonial, Rating: 4 "Huh, interesting!" | Leave a comment

Siddham — 650 AD, India

Buddhists in around 400 AD wrote Sanskrit with a version of Gupta script that eventually diverged into Siddham script.  At first, writing down the Sanskrit was used mostly as a memorization aid, but when Buddhism spread to the much-more literate … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, now ceremonial, Rating: 4 "Huh, interesting!" | 2 Comments

Khojki — 1350 AD, Pakistan

Khojki was developed in around 1350 AD by Pir Sadardin in the Sindh region of Pakistan for recording Ismaili (a branch of Shia Islam) religious literature, mostly in the Sindhi language.  As with its sibling Gurmukhi, it is very similar … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, now ceremonial, Rating: 4 "Huh, interesting!" | Leave a comment

Sharada — 800 AD, India

Sharada — also called Sarada and Sharda — is descended from Gupta through Kutila (a writing system so obscure that I wasn’t able to find enough to write about, and I have pretty low standards).  Sharada’s use centered in Kashmir, … Continue reading

Posted in Abugida, now ceremonial, Rating: 2 "Not all that interesting" | 3 Comments

Naxi Geba — 1200 AD? S. China

Like its sibling (parent?) script, Naxi Dongba, Naxi Geba is highly idiosyncratic and used mostly for religious writings.  Unlike Naxi Dongba, Naxi Geba is a syllabary, but different people used different symbols for the same syllable. This makes it less … Continue reading

Posted in now ceremonial, Rating: 3 "I did not know that", Syllabaries | 2 Comments